//
archives

Early Teaching Career Guidance

This category contains 10 posts

A Blog Blog: The things that seem to matter

When I started this blog, I didn’t really expect very much.  As a veteran bedroom-studio musician, I’m used to the tumbleweed of indifference to my creations.  I flogged my music through MySpace for a couple of years and got absolutely nowhere beyond a few scraps of encouragement.  So, with low expectations to start with, the … Continue reading

10 Reasons to Love Teaching

1. Doing the things you love while you’re at work It has always struck me as remarkable and fortuitous that I am paid to do a job where I get to have so much fun. In my lessons, I have the chance to explore my favourite subject – Physics. Today I was talking about space, … Continue reading

New Challenge? Advice for getting that job.

Very often I’m asked for advice from teachers applying for jobs, either colleagues or friends.  Each person’s context is unique to them but the messages are usually the same so I thought I would share them.  As a Headteacher, getting the right people into the right roles within my school is one of the most … Continue reading

POST 100: 12 steps to a ‘Great Teacher’ reputation.

Introduction. I’m celebrating writing my 100th post, by trying to link together various posts relating to teaching.  I suggest in my post ‘How do I know how good my teachers are?’ that there are three key sources that contribute to my judgement of the effectiveness of my teaching staff: Data – the measured outcomes from … Continue reading

Behaviour Management: A Bill Rogers Top 10

Behaviour Management Strategies from Bill Rogers Without doubt the greatest personal challenge I’ve faced as a teacher was moving from the Sixth Form college in Wigan where I started teaching, to Holland Park School in London in my mid-20s.  Having established the idea in my mind that I was a pretty good teacher, it was … Continue reading

Making Feedback Count: “Close the Gap”

Recently I have been looking again at the issue of marking. It is a hugely important source of feedback provided that we keep the volume of marking in proportion to the level of impact it can have in improving learning outcomes.  I’ve discussed this in a much-read earlier post: Marking in Perspective: Selective, Formative, Effective, … Continue reading

Gifted and Talented provision: a total philosophy

One of my core beliefs as a teacher: G&T is a total philosophy of teaching and learning. At both a pedagogical and strategic leadership level, I’d argue that cracking the issue of ‘G&T’ provision is the key to success – in the classroom and across the whole school.  In fact, I think that if the … Continue reading

To maximise learning, get your students RAMPed

The acid test of any CPD is probably that, many years later, you remember it and you use it.  One example for me was a nugget of gold from Trevor Hawes, (Optimal Learning) who came to Jakarta when I was at the British International School there.  He summarised the need to create the right conditions … Continue reading

THE Number 1 Bit of Classroom Kit: Mini-whiteboards

At KEGS we have made it possible for every teacher to have a set of mini-whiteboards or ‘show-me boards’ in every classroom, as featured in a recent newsletter.  A full set with pens and wipers costs £60 – a bargain. We are now trying to introduce dry-wipe pens as compulsory school equipment. So, why are … Continue reading

The ‘Washing Hands’ of Learning: Think Pair Share

A blog about something really obvious but worth spelling out. After 25 years of teaching, I’ve been through a fair amount of dodgy INSET/CPD. As a result I am something of a ‘visiting speaker’ sceptic. However, it hasn’t all been bad; far from it. Some ideas have been very influential such as the ideas behind … Continue reading

Archives

Blog Stats

  • 1,006,702 hits

Twitter Updates

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 24,343 other followers